6.13.2013

How to Make Chalk Paint

Chalk paint. Have you heard about it? Annie Sloan is famous for it and it's been all over blog land. In fact, Annie Sloan's variety has been called "the best paint in the world". Okay, I got that from their site so it might be a little bias, but I've never heard a bad thing about the stuff... except the price. It's steep. And they may be justified in that price, but me being a DIYer and refusing to pay retail for almost everything (I have a problem, we are all aware), I gave that price a big fat "Pshaaaa" and decided to figure out how to make chalk paint myself.

Before we get into that, you might be wondering what is chalk paint and why would anyone want to use it instead of regular paint? Well, in my own non-scientific-I-only-know-this-because-I've-used-it observations, chalk paint is regular paint mixed with a little plaster and water. When you paint a few coats of it and sand between them, the finish gets very soft and smooth and "chalk" like. It also dries very matte and can be waxed to add a slight sheen and protect whatever it is you've painted.

I've also noticed that I have no brush marks with chalk paint and the furniture pieces I have painted and waxed have absolutely no chips. (That said, they are not in a super high-traffic area) The surface looks very professional. I have heard that you don't need to prep or sand whatever it is you are painting first with chalk paint, but that just doesn't seem like a good idea to me. The pieces I've painted got a quick sanding first and a wipe down with a damp towel. It might be true, but I didn't go that route. Call me chicken, it's cool.

Katie from Sew Woodsy was actually the first person/blogger I knew that used chalk paint that she made herself. Katie and her husband Jon painted Craig's List dressers and since I might know Katie in real life :)... I got to see them in person. I couldn't get over the finish. So smooth! They had me convinced and I got the recipe. Without further rambling...

  • 2 Cups Paint (I wouldn't use anything glossier than an eggshell finish)
  • 1/3 Cup Plaster of Paris - About $7 for a giant carton
  • 2 Tbsp Water

That's it! Mix that shize together in an old Tupperware and you're set. Now, me being me and not really measuring anything, I'll admit I probably eyeballed some a lot of that. No problems! 

Check it out. I chalk painted my Goodwill End Tables.

And my fancy shmancy sewing desk is also chalk painted.

And, my DIY Map Table.  I'm starting to think I might have a thing for white furniture. Note to self: no more white.

After you do about 3 coats, sanding and wiping the dust off between each one, you'll want to wax. I use Minwax Paste Finishing Wax. You can buy it by the stains at Home Depot or Lowes. Just like waxing a car. I rubbed it on with an old cloth diaper, waited about 5 minutes, and buffed. Slight arm work out in the process but no one wants "bingo arms", amiright? ; )

That's it. How to make chalk paint ala Sarah. Hope it was helpful! If you get motivated enough to try it... email me your garage sale/thrift store/Craig's List transformations. I love seeing them and showing you off!

116 comments :

  1. LOVE IT girl .. I see how busy you are while they snooze my sweet friend.. I have been making chalk paint too. Less expensive and just as effective ... Love this post and everything in it .. I will mention you on my business fb page if okay .. LEME Know .. .hugs

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    1. Ah! How did I not reply to this until now?! Thanks Sherry, you're always so sweet. You can mention me anytime! No need to ask. :)

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  2. Silly question . . . does chalk paint leave the same kind of sticky finish on furniture that I get with latex? I'm talking about whatever it is that makes books and paper stick to the painted surface - even years after I painted the bookcase. I don't know whether it's caused by operator error in paint selection or in painting technique, but it's sure discouraging.

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    1. No sticky finish at all! I know exactly what you mean. I have a painted table ( spray paint I think) and years later the picture frames still stick to it!

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    2. Total disaster 1/3 cup plaster paris an 2 cups paint is one big blob???

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    3. Dang it! The paint is really thick but not too thick that you can't spread it. Hmmmm, maybe the results are different with different paints? I will have to experiment then do an update post! Thanks for the feedback! Were you using flat paint? Just guessing because I know flat paint it usually thicker in texture to begin with. I used egg shell so maybe that's the difference.

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    4. some girls i know water down annie sloan to a consistancy of single cream ,if thats any help

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    5. TJ..did you mix the POP with water first? It should be like peanut butter..then mix it with the paint. It does get thick, but not blob thick. I use satin and it works well..I am turning a little one drawer chest into a coffee station...I just mixed up some more of my under coat paint..did a drawer and it went on beautifully.
      Here is what I found and use:
      Mark four equal lines on a clear plastic container. Add Plaster of Paris to reach the very first line. Then mix in about a tablespoon of water at a time until the Plaster of Paris is nice and smooth. You don't want any lumps. Then fill to the top line with paint and stir well. Super easy! I've found that if you don't mix the water into the Plaster of Paris first, the paint sometimes ends up gritty and no matter how much water you add at that point, you just can't get rid of the grit. And different brands of paint are thicker than others, so just adjust as needed. And just like regular chalk paint, the homemade version will thicken as it sits, so just add more water as needed.

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  3. I tried your recipe for chalk paint and it was an EPIC failure! I can't figure out what I did wrong, but I used your amounts and I ended up with a big blob of pink plaster of paris that hardened while I watched. I tried to save it by adding more water, but it got lumpy. I have been wanting to make my own chalk paint for a while now, but I may have to give up if I can't do any better! :(

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    1. Oh man! Craft fail! I wonder what happened??? My paint was pretty thick but not clumpy. Try it again with a different brand of paint maybe. :( Crud, I hope it worked for you!

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    2. Can you PLEASE share the exact type (latex, etc?) and brand of paint that you used in your recipe to successfully create the chalk paint?? I would love to know before I purchase the wrong materials! I"m so tempted to plunk down the money for the Annie Sloan, but am willing to give the recipe a try first!! Thank you!

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    4. Hi Julie! I used Behr Interior, Egg Shell. I just used pure white right off the shelf. No color mixed in. I've also used this same recipe and added some craft paint to tint the white and that has worked fine too. For the end table I just did for my bedroom I actually watered it down a little more. Coverage is not as good meaning you'll have to do more coats but I found I didn't have to sand as much. So it's a toss up between more coats of paint or more time with the sandpaper. Honestly, I do not measure anymore when I make chalk paint. I just eye ball it. If it seems lumpy, add more paint/water. If it seems thin, add a little more plaster.

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  4. Tried it on a stool/shelf I picked up from a neighbours trash pile...Loved it! I halfed your recipie, and had more than enough paint, the mix worked perfectly! So excited to see it in my little guys room. For sanding in between coats did you do it by hand or with a power sander? And did you sand after the last coat?

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    1. Hi Misty. Yay!!! I love when a plan works out. haha Where ever there was a large enough flat surface, I used an orbital power sander. But, on the curvy parts, legs, edges... I sanded by hand. On the last coat I sanded really lightly by hand with a fine grit paper, wiped off the dust, then waxed. Hope that helps!

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  6. Hey, how easy is the surface to clean after painted? Would you recommend fordining room table and chairs?

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    1. My end tables that are chalk painted and waxed get cleaned with Pledge and look great. That said, they only ever have dust on them... not food or spills like a dining room table would. I would say the chairs would be great in chalk paint but I haven't tested enough to know if the table would hold up. I'm guessing you would have to re-wax it occasionally? So there's a maintenance factor there. I have to look into this one!

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  7. I wanna know how you did that geometric pattern on the side of your fancy schmancy desk?!

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    1. Hi Sarah. It's a smaller version of my Moroccan Wall stencil. Here's the tutorial. Really easy and cheap! http://www.whiletheysnooze.blogspot.com/2012/07/diy-moroccan-style-wall-stencil.html

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  8. I made my chalk paint this weekend and it worked Great! Try mixing just the plaster and water first.... Using cold water... You can add more water if needed but mix til smooth then add to your paint. I used the Glidden satin finish since I had it on hand but the consistency was perfect with making the paste first then adding into the Paint!

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  9. Here's another recipe ladies, buy a bag of unsanded white grout. Use 2 tbls of this mixed with 2 tbls water, add to one cup of paint. Works great, it will be a little thick. I've used this with Behr, Valspar and Glidden with the exact same results..I'll email you a picture of a little chest of drawers I just finished.

    Naomi@ piecesofgracerestoration.blogspot.com

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    1. I was under the impression that unsanded tile grout mixed into paint would be for chalkboard paint, not chalk paint. But that's what I read...

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  10. Interesting stuff. Just priced Annie Sloan at £18 for 1 litres. Fortune. Might pluck up courage to make my own

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    1. I know how you feel. I'm not going to lie... Annie Sloan paint is really nice. The finishes are beautiful, but it costs a lot. Since I had regular latex paint in my garage and plaster only costs $7, I figured I didn't have much to lose. I'm sure my variety isn't as nice as AS, bit for $7, it was a close second for me. :)

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  11. How much chalk paint did this make? I am getting ready to do a giant hutch (6' x 6' x 1.5') and don't want to run out!

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    1. Hmmmm, I think you might get away with using a quart of paint. This recipe makes just about 2 cups and it was plenty for my end tables. I would suggest making your a little watery-er. Mix the plaster and water first, then add it to the paint. I'm figuring the hutch probably has some details that think paint would just get all messy in.

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  12. I'm heading out to work on a great little project today using your tutorial! Wish me luck! :) And thanks for sharing!!

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  13. Hi I'm excited to try a piece what color white did you use? I like that shade..

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    1. Hi! I just used the plain old white right off the Home Depot shelf. I did not have any color mixed. Ask if you're not sure which one to buy. There are different types of "white" paint. They will direct you to the pure bright white.

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  14. Wondering if I could paint a small wall in a playroom to allow my kids to draw on like an eisle. Have you tried drawing with chalk on the paint prior to waxing it?

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    1. No. "Chalk paint" is not the same as chalkboard paint. It's called chalk paint because the texture is very smooth and chalky. Almost dusty. Chalkboard paint is much rougher and more durable. I don't think chalk would erase very well from chalk paint at all! :)

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  15. How did you do add the WORLD MAP to the table above? I am new at all this Repuposing stuff..and I am HOOKED!!! Thanks for the chalk paint recipe! I is amazing! I love the stuff, it's not sticky and it holds on to ANYTHING!

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    1. Hi Jeana! Welcome to the club... DIYers anonymous. :) Here's the link for the map table... http://www.whiletheysnooze.blogspot.com/2013/03/diy-map-table-tutorial.html That crazy project is all there. Thanks!

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  16. This is EXACTLY what I was looking for! I first heard about chalk paint at a vintage furniture shop and they were offering a class on how to make it for $150! I said forget it and decided to Google the recipe instead. So thank you so very much for posting this recipe, I'm going to try it and paint an old thrift store nightstand that I got tired of! I'll send you photos when I'm done! Now onto choosing a color...

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    1. Yay! Remember, if the paint is too thick, you can always add more water. Some people were having a problem with that. I think it really depends on your paint. Good luck, and yes, send me pics! :)

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  17. I haven't tried annie sloan paint but want to try your version. just wondering about wax because I really like the dark wax to antique the piece. does minwax make that also? thanks!

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    1. Ahhh, read the two comments below. I bet both of those would work. I predict some testing in my future! Good tips! I don't think Minwax makes a tinted wax but I will ask them.

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  18. Robin, I have read that you can add a little stain to the Minwax wax to achieve the antiqued look. Hope this helps.

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    1. Thanks for the tip Sherri! I'm going to try that. :)

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  19. Never tried it, but I heard that dark shoe polish works, too. Spread a layer of clear wax, shoe polish on with one rag, off with the other, then re-wax.

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    1. Thanks for the tip! I'm going to try this one too!

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  20. just wondering about the wax...I am refinishing my dining table...I am going to the stain and wax the top and chalk paint the leg and chairs...but on the buffing...I have read lots of blogs about how hard it is to buff to that shine...can you use a regular like car buffer for large items? and do I sand in between coats of wax on the table top

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    1. Hi! YES! Use a car buffer! I used one on my dresser and have also let two friends borrow it for furniture waxing purposes. It makes things so easy. I just have a cheapo one from Walmart. And, NO... do not sand the wax. Wipe a coat of wax on with a rag, wait a minute or two. Buff with the car buffer. Then wait like 15 or so minutes to put the next coat on. That's what I did and it worked well. Hope that helps!

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  21. I tried your recipe last night, after trying one off another blog and ending up with clay. I did add probably 3 T of water vs 2 and it seemed to help better. I think that it really really depends on your paint. I had a can of valspar paint & primer in 1 and its already thick, so adjust accordingly. That said Sarah - by the time you finished painting, was your paint starting to get too thick to paint? I had that problem last night. Adding more paint helped a little but was very lumpy. . . next time I may halve it.

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    1. Oh man! I really need to edit this post and let people know to experiment. Seems like thick paint is a little too common. : / But yes, my paint was starting to get thick by the end and I just added more water. Some people have told be that if you mix the water and plaster first and make that smooth and a little runny, then add it to the paint, that works the best. In my experience it was easier to make the paint thinner (more water) and do more coats than it was to keep the paint thick and have to sand more of the brush strokes out. But, in the end, they both gave me the same finish. I'm glad you tried it! Did the finished product turn out well?

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  22. it looks fantastic!! And I love that table. thanks for great tips.Princess Car Beds

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  23. Excellent info, thanks a million. I used Anita's Plaster of Paris and a water based satin paint. The results were outstanding. A pal of mine also said you can use Artex instead of plaster of Paris as this is what they paint on bare brick walls in Bistros. Thanks again for the tip.

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    1. Thanks! I'm excited to try different ways to make it next time. I never knew there were so many until people started leaving comments. So thanks! Excited to see the differences.

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  24. I'm looking to paint for my first time using chalk paint and will try this recipe. I'm looking at painting a piece black and hanging this piece in the bathroom. Little worried about th
    e waxing and sanding part. Didn't think you needed to to sand when using chalk paint? Also has anyone heard how this paint holds up to some moisture since will be hanging in bathroom?

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    1. Hmmm, have not tested in a bathroom, so not sure about the moisture part. The "no sanding" part of chalk paint is no sanding the original piece before you start. (I always do anyway)... or at least that what they say. You have to sand each coat of paint once you start to achieve the powdery finish. If you don't sand, it will be gritty. Hope that helps!

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  25. I have a very ornate old framed mirror that I am wanting to update. I want to try chalk paint and wax. My question is if I am painting then sanding off, it will just be the top of the ornate part right? Then I wax that and paint again? I have not seen this on an ornate item so I can't get a visual in my mind. I just don't want the grooves to be packed with paint or wax. Any advice is appreciated.

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    1. That's tough. Painting it would be no problem I think. Sanding it would be really hard. You'd have to do it all by hand. Also, you're right, the wax would get stuck in the ornate parts. Once you wax, you can't paint again. They paint just won't stick. You paint, then sand the paint, then paint more coats and sand until you're happy with the finish. Once the wax is on, there's no more sanding or painting. That's the end. I would suggest spraying something ornate. :/ Hope that helps a little!

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    2. Thanks for the info. Now I know the steps. I didn't realize you don't wax until your done! I have an old little ornate frame that I think I will experiment on and see before I start the big one, it's 5 feet long, huge old mirror!

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    3. Do you think that perhaps a matt spray paint would be more suitable for ornate/intricately carved pieces? I know that on motifs etc, it looks fabulous, but I have also have a very detailed old mirror that is gold and has quite a bit of detail and I think that perhaps the paint/wax would cause much of the detail to get lost or be quite painful to finish. JudithS, I'd love to hear what you have found in your experiments

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  26. What kind of paint di you use? Flat or semi gloss?

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    1. My finish was eggshell. So one step up from flat. :)

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  27. Hi All, couple of quick tips. Do not use Valspar with the primer in it, the primer they use in the paint makes it impossible to make chalk paint. Also although chalkboard and chalk paint are not exactly the same, as long as you don't wax, you can make a chalk wall or write on your furniture with chalk. Always mix your POP and water before adding to paint, and it should be sour cream consistency. Good luck all. Great clog.

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    1. Valspar (or any brand) paint and primer in one does not actually have primer in it, It just means that it is of high enough quality to self prime. I am a Paint Manager at Lowes and I have 5-10 people a week looking for Chalk Paint.

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    2. I used the Valspar Ultra paint + primer in the flat finish and it worked just fine. Absolutely no problems.

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  28. Hi All, POP and grout are considered toxic when inhaled so wear a mask and eye protection when sanding and be in a well ventilated area. There are non-toxic recipes that use calcium carbonate or baking soda. Happy Painting

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    1. Good to know!! I always wear a mask but not really eye protection so thanks for letting me know! I'll be sure to keep the kids away too when sanding. :)

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  29. Just throwing it all together ended up very lumpy for me. I figured when I tried it I should have mixed the water and POP first, so will give this a try.

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    1. Hi Sheila. Yeah, several people have said they got lumps now but that seems to lessen if you mix the plaster and water first, then add it to the paint. Hope that helps!

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  30. Can you use stain instead of paint?

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    1. Nope. The stain will not mix with the chalk or plaster that you mix in. Has to be paint.

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  31. I have a question - what about covering old dresser finished with lacquer? It has VERY red stain underneath under the finish. ( I guess the whole idea was to make it look like dark cherry) In some spots lacquer is gone...On top of everything..it tested positive for lead. I really like the piece but sanding is out of question..would chalk paint stick to glossy surface? Will it cover unevenness in spots where lacquier is gone?

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    1. That's a rough one. When I first started reading I thought... sand it! Then I kept reading. Yeah, don't sand! Maybe the hardware store has a primer specifically for that. (covering up lead based paint) I just did a quick google search and found this... http://www.ehow.com/info_8529835_type-primer-covers-lead-paint.html That's the route I would go. Sand and seal that lead paint in, then start the chalk paint. Hope that helps!

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  32. Use chalk! I tried your recipe with powdered chalk instead of plaster of paris, and it worked great.

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  33. Use chalk instead of plaster. It doesn't clump and that's how chalk paint got its name...(I know, right?) You can order chalk online, and probably can find it in a hardware store, though I haven't tried. Good luck, fellow painters.

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    1. I love comments! You guys give me so many ideas I would not have thought of. I know it's called "chalk" paint but it really never dawned on me to add chalk. So many different techniques and recipes. I'm really glad you guys are so willing to share. I would love to do a post where I compare all of the recipe variations that have come in. Hmmmm... now just to convince the husband I have that many things to paint. lol

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  34. I'm wondering - would this work/stick to other surfaces besides wood? I have an melamine cabinet and a metal table that I'd like to do something with. Just wondering if it would end up scraping off? Has anyone tried?

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    1. I have not tried that but I would think if you gave the cabinet a good sanding first and really roughed it up, the paint would stick. Anyone have any insight on that???

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    2. Use the Rustoleum spray primer. It can go over plastic, melamine is plastic. It will give you a nice surface to paint on.

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  35. Loved the tutorial. So far I've done a corner unit, end table, log box and a TV stand. Needless to say I have one happy wife and a new hobby. Thank you so much

    X

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  36. Thank you so much for the tutorial. So far I have painted an old corner unit, end table, log box and a TV stand. Needless to say I have one happy wife and a new hobby.

    Thanks

    X

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    1. Awesome Chris! Can you come chat with my husband??? lol Thanks for stopping by!!!

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  37. I knew someone had the recipe.. LOL.. I was going to actually get a bunch of the big boxes of chalk and grind it down then add to the paint!.. I might try a little of it beings I have BOXES of chalk just to experiment.. but its great to know there is a tried and true right here! Thanks!
    Debra- DeSoto Mo.

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    1. I'm pretty sure that would work too Debra! I'm curious to see how that goes. :) I feel like chalk paint is really forgiving... too thick? Just add water. Too thin? More paint. It's easy. I think the real chalk would give you the same results.

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  38. Has anyone tried using polycrylic with chalk paint instead of wax? Or is that a big no no?

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    1. Never done it. Good question. Anyone???

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    2. I used poly with the chalk paint recipe I got from this site, and it works great. Just make sure you don't sit anything on the surface for at least a week. The longer poly sits, the harder it is.

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    3. I used poly on a small table I painted using the chalk paint recipe from this site. It worked great, just be sure to not set anything on the surface for at least a week so the poly has longer to cure. The longer it sets, the harder it gets.

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    4. Thanks Cassie! I just used Polycrylic on a kitchen table I refinished (not with chalk paint). The directions say wait 24 hours for use but I'm giving that sucker a week in the garage before I bring it in. :) Now I know I can use it on chalk paint too. cool!

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  39. I tried your recipe for the chalk paint with a slight variation. I used a desert spoon instead of a
    table spoon (which is slightly bigger)! and added four desert spoonfuls. I used Satinwood paint. I found the consistency to be lovely and creamy, quite easy to work with. If I have one piece of advice to impart its to completely wash your brush between coat, as this slightly thins the mixture without directly adding too much water. I did however add water between coats if it became a little too thick. But I so happy with the result. Thank you so much, just wanted to balance things out on this blog!

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    1. Thanks Bernadette! So glad it worked out! I've had great success with the batches I've made and almost never measure anymore. haha Thanks for letting me know!

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  40. HI, I have an old iron bed i'd love to paint with your recipe for Chalk Paint. Do you think it will work!
    i've all ready cleaned & sanded her. Love to hear your thoughts. PS. Thanks for the recipe..

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    1. Well, I've never painted metal but if you've sanded I would think it would stick. I would probably do a coat of primer made for metal before hand though. Some people have commented that chalk paint does work on metal but I've never tried. If the bed was already previously painted, and you sanded that, I don't think you'll have any trouble even with no primer. That sounds gorgeous by the way! :)

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  41. Hi, I have an old iron bed i'd love to paint with your recipe. do you think it will work. I've already cleaned & sanded her. I'd love to hear your thoughts. By the way thanks for sharing! :)

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  42. Great Blog. I am starting my panting this weekend. Everyone I know in the antique world says I can use chalk paint works on metal, wood, particle board, etc. I did buy a Ce Ce brand premixed "sample" size so I could compare the recipe here with a "brand". I just don't want to spend the money on the premade stuff and I want more colors.. I intend to try it all. lol I will be painting this weekend.

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    1. Go for it! I was too cheap to invest in the real stuff.. haha! But, I had a friend who did a whole dresser in Annie Sloan and it came out beautiful. The paint is really nice but you pay for that. Don't be afraid to adjust the DIY recipe if you're finding your paint too thick. It's very forgiving. Just add more water or more paint and mix until you're happy. Hope everything goes well!

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  43. We will be trying this out later this week hopefully! Looking forward to trying some new colours and textures for our shop! Many thanks!

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  44. Hi,

    Just loved this and your refreshing way of putting everything. Have got a whole list of things I am going to get started on now. Love the fresh look of everything and bring on the white.

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    1. Thanks! I try to write how I would want someone to talk to me and be as informative as I can so you can make something you love. Hope that's coming across! haha

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  45. Will this work on upholstery? On Annie Sloans website she uses in on some chairs, will this recipe work?

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    1. I've never tried but judging on how thick the paint gets, I would say no. I would imagine it would get rather crunchy and crack. Maybe watering it down a lot might give you something you could work with on upholstery, but I would definitely do a test before painting the actual piece. Hope that helps a little. :)

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  46. I just went to 6 different stores looking for chalk paint which no one carries...I'm in Canada and we obviously don't "get" chalk paint, so I'm forever indebted to you for this recipe. I can now make my own colors exactly as as I want them, too! You rock Sarah!

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  47. Exactly! You can make whatever you want now :) So glad it helped and you paint something awesome! Thanks!!!

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  48. What would you use to add colors? (Gallon of paint/ lots of different projects) I would love to try the recipe but I wanna do different pieces in different colors.

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    1. Hmm. Well, depending on what color you're starting with you might be kind of limited. I had a large amount of white leftover and kept pouring some out into plastic cups and mixing with craft paint. But, since I started with white, all of the colors were pretty light/pastel. I wonder what the paint stores use to make really dark colors. hmm. Maybe that helps a little? Craft paint mixed with small amounts of your gallon in plastic cups (add the plaster and water just like you would normally).

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  49. If you mix the plaster of Paris and water in a separate container and add it to the paint and mix well it goes much smother for the people that are having problems (:

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  50. I've been mixing my own chalk paint for a long time using POP. And after jacking up a lot of furniture and spending a ton of money on sand paper the best advice I can give is to mix your POP & water in a separate container before adding it to your paint. If you don't then you will have clumps with out a doubt. I also use my chalk paint on everything....wood, metal and, plastic. It works just fine. I use a wipe or spray on poly for metal and plastic and wax for anything wood. Hope this helps some ppl.

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    1. Ahhh, thank you so much! I love these kind of comments. Sharing your experiences to help everyone out. Great advice and now I'm inspired to try my DIY version of chalk paint on other surfaces besides wood. Thank You! - Sarah

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  51. This is what I thought as well last night when I went to look at the dried first coat of my chair I did. It looked GREEN but the paint was a bright yellow lol SO, I think I figured out what the deal is, after looking online a lot Ive realized that many recommend not using paint that has primer already in it! mine does! it made it pretty thin. but then i also read that one lady said after she sanded and then did a few more coats she ended up loving it. so a bit more work. i also only used 1p pop and 1/3 cup TEMID water. many of these blogs are saying to use HOT water but on the lowes store site, they say to use cool/warm not cold not hot water. the hot water being recommended is going ot depend a lot on what others consider HOT i will take advice from a lowes home imporovemnt store anyday over trying to guess which out of 100s of blogs ive read is right haha. i lovse chalk paint blog posts and i might do my own since im CLEARLY gonna have to take my paint back (i had bought 2 gallons i had originally planned to paint the kids room with but chnaged my mind) and i bought at walmart. tried to buy flat but the guy talked my hubby into the one with primier alreayd in it. ANYWAYS. im taking that stuff back today and going to a real paint store, gettin g a flat, non primered and trying again.
    I started on a pretty difficult (I thought would be easy haha it isnt) piece, a chair that i didnt dnotice the 100 knooks and crannies before i started painint it. its a very dark wood so to get it to the bright yellow is gonna take a few nd the paint needs to be NOT so thin.
    My top tips in all this: 1. start small. buy a SAMPLE of paint not a gallon like i did lol
    2. read lots and lots of blogs and figure out what will work best for your first attempt 3. make that FIRST ATTEMPT on something very small and FLAT, like a picture frame for instance :) 4. write down what you do each time so you can LEARN and tweak what works and what doesnt

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  52. My top tips in all this:
    1. start small. buy a SAMPLE of paint not a gallon like i did; you can always buy more later. I i bought the paint with primer in it and didnt know better at the time. get FLAT, regular paint.

    2. read lots and lots of blogs and figure out what will work best for your first attempt and write down what you do!

    3. make that FIRST ATTEMPT on something very small and FLAT, like a picture frame for instance NOT a piece of furniture that you like lol get the FEEL of the paint and how to apply it:)

    4. AGAIN, write down what you do and how you mix and what you mix with and amounts of what,each time so you can LEARN and tweak what works and what doesnt, write notes on how it dries, how it looks and anything you like or dont like to tweak better for next coat or next piece.

    ALSO I HAVE A QUESTION OF MY OWN PLEASE for the owner of this blog. Did you make the piece above that has teh stenciled circle like pattern that matches that yellow lamp? I have that same yellow pattern in my own room so Id love to know 1. where you got that lamp and if i could MAKE one with a stencil and paint lol i HAVE painted lamp shades before! 2. my most IMPORTANT question is where can i find a tutorial on how to do the patterns and the chevron one as well? I have one dresser with all kinds of different places that i want to be really a lot ifferent colors and patterns i just need to know HOW. im not crafty at all lol. thank you so much!

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  53. I ran out of primer and tried chalk paint as a primer for my door trim. I used this recipe...latex paint mixed with joint compound aka drywall compound, that was pre mixed. So no water added. I could not believe how well it adhered to the molding. I have a 40 year old house, and the molding has some dings, the chalk paint covered all the dings. I put one coat on, and intend to do another. Then I am going to paint the door trim with either latex or SW acrylic. Paint. I want to seal it we'll because the trim is on a bathroom door.
    I cannot wait to use it on a piece of furniture, I really cannot believe how silky it is.
    Thank you for your great tutorial.

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  54. wow interesting, It's my first time knowing this chalk painting and I would love to try this also! If I have already made it hopefully I can also share it with you.

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  55. What kind of brush did you use to apply the Chalk Paint? I heard the Annie Sloan round brush is such a good investment but did you use something cheaper that worked just as well? Also, did you use the Pure White on all your white projects because I really like that color of white for two dressers I am about to attempt to do....right after I do a practice piece first! :) You can reply to my email if needed at sunseteve_65@yahoo.com. Thank you! Loved your instructions and sharing your recipe!

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  56. Oh! So sorry, I do have one more question....I have heard of the finishing wax, Rub On Poly and also Poly-Crylic spray on sealer....I see you use the Finishing Wax but was wondering if you had used any of the other two? I DO NOT want my pieces to "yellow", have you had a problem with this, especially on pieces such as a dresser or desk that gets a lot of use, I want it to be durable. Thank you! sunseteve_65@yahoo.com

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    1. I emailed you! But just in case it helps other people... regular old white Behr paint off the shelf from Home Depot, a regular Purdy paint brush... nothing special, and I've only ever waxed chalk painted pieces. Haven't tried poly on them yet. :)

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